Identifying and responding to male patients who use intimate partner violence

05-04-2023 13:47

One in five men report lifetime physical intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration or use. Few clinical reviews or expert opinion exist to support clinical guidelines for family medicine providers to identify and respond to male patient IPV use. We searched PubMed and relevant databases for peer-reviewed articles assessing male IPV use definitions, prevalence, associated health problems, health service use, help-seeking behavior, identification questions and techniques, severity assessment, response and treatment options in healthcare and community settings. Several screening tools exist including the 3-question PERPS and 4-question HITS screens. Community treatment programs specializing in care for people who are harmful in their intimate relationships exist as group counseling sessions mandated by the criminal justice system for men charged with assaulting their partner, however these programs' effectiveness is limited, and no study assesses referrals of men from healthcare settings. The SafERteens and Strength at Home evidence-based programs reduce IPV use identified in healthcare settings, but these programs have not been expanded to routine outpatient family medicine clinical practice. Given high prevalence of male patient IPV use, family medicine providers can consider several screening tools to identify male IPV use. Effective interventions and referrals are limited but are being adapted for primary care.

Author(s):Vijay Singh MD, Brian Penti MD, Peter Cronholm MD
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Uploaded - 05-04-2023
One in five men report lifetime physical intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration or use. Few clinical reviews or expert opinion exist to support clinical guidelines for family medicine providers to identify and respond to male patient IPV use. We searched PubMed and relevant databases for peer-reviewed articles assessing male IPV use definitions, prevalence, associated health problems, health service use, help-seeking behavior, identification questions and techniques, severity assessment, response and treatment options in healthcare and community settings. Several screening tools exist including the 3-question PERPS and 4-question HITS screens. Community treatment programs specializing in care for people who are harmful in their intimate relationships exist as group counseling sessions mandated by the criminal justice system for men charged with assaulting their partner, however these programs' effectiveness is limited, and no study assesses referrals of men from healthcare settings. The SafERteens and Strength at Home evidence-based programs reduce IPV use identified in healthcare settings, but these programs have not been expanded to routine outpatient family medicine clinical practice. Given high prevalence of male patient IPV use, family medicine providers can consider several screening tools to identify male IPV use. Effective interventions and referrals are limited but are being adapted for primary care.

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